A is for AHREF

Sep 14

“…find a way to make it interesting. That’s what you need to do: find a question that makes the world interesting. People who do great things look at the same world everyone else does, but notice some odd detail that’s compellingly mysterious.” — Paul Graham (via abiekatz)

May 16

Living in the future is weird

These are real stories making the news recently:

Apr 24

Jan 28

Choosing the right path for you -

moot:

From my own experience, my "hobby" has rewarded me with a great sense of purpose and touched the lives of tens—if not hundreds—of millions of people over the past 10 years.

I don’t meet many people who are tripping over themselves to build hobby or “lifestyle” businesses these days, but some of the happiest, most fulfilled people I know run these types of business and wouldn’t trade them for anything.

There’s something very empowering about being able to explore an idea you love on your own terms.

Mar 24

There’s a very fragile line

At about the 15 minute mark in the post game press conference Marquette head coach Buzz Williams was asked to explain a late game defensive adjustment. After quickly dismissing the question, Buzz paused and then interrupted another reporter to respond to the original question - a telltale sign he’s about to say something great.  

Here’s his response (speaking to the journalist):

What happens is there’s a very fragile line in your life, in your industry. As your industry has changed, people have lost their jobs, their livelihood. Family’s have changed.

(insert a random line about twitterverse faux-swag)

There’s a fragile line in our industry too. And that fragile line is how hard it is to get a job. How hard it is to get a good job. And of the small collection of good jobs, how hard it is to have a good job and make it a great job.

The hardest thing in life to get is momentum. And the hardest thing in life to keep is momentum…

The reason why my answer to your question is “no” is because the next game we play is going to be another one possession game…I hope…just like the last two we’ve played. And so…I wanna see if we can win another game in the NCAA tournament.

I’m not a genius. I don’t want to be a genius. I don’t want to be Mr. Tactician. I don’t want to be tactical, I want to be tough. Within that toughness, and this is what’s missed, is that there’s a discipline that’s required to have that toughness. 

We do some things, but I don’t want to tell you what, cause I want to pass the Sweet 16 test. 

I love Buzz and love #mubb. Go Marquette.

Dec 08

evangotlib:

comicsodissey:

Muhammad Ali vs Street Fighter in Rue Saint Denis, Paris

I have a large white wall in my apartment this needs to be on.  Immediately.

evangotlib:

comicsodissey:

Muhammad Ali vs Street Fighter in Rue Saint Denis, Paris

I have a large white wall in my apartment this needs to be on.  Immediately.

(via parislemon)

Nov 26

Nov 18

parislemon:

nevver:

1979

parislemon:

nevver:

1979

Nov 14

Bones Brigade Documentary: Yes

Just finished watching the Bones Brigade documentary and really enjoyed it. Pretty much every person profiled had something to teach the audience about life - about how to pursue a passion, overcome challenges…the big stuff.

Off the top of my head:

And lastly - regardless of what a person looks like on the outside (winning lots of events, inventing cool tricks) you never know what they’re going through internally. A lot of these dudes seemed to face some heavy moments at or near what outsiders would describe as their “peak” of success.

Nov 11

So you want to be right more often?

Two related posts with a similar theme: being right.

The first is from Jeff Bezos:

"He said people who were right a lot of the time were people who often changed their minds. He doesn’t think consistency of thought is a particularly positive trait. It’s perfectly healthy — encouraged, even — to have an idea tomorrow that contradicted your idea today."

The other via John Gruber:

What you want is to be (1) right more often than wrong; (2) willing to recognize when you are wrong; and (3) able and willing to correct whatever is wrong. If you expect perfection, to be right all the time, you’re going to fail on all three of those. 

Related: Gingrich ‘dumbfounded’ by Obama win, but… 

"We need to stop, take a deep breath and learn." He added, "The president won an extraordinary victory. And the fact is, we owe him the respect of trying to understand what they did and how they did it…to succeed in the future, we will have to learn the lessons of 2012. An intellectually honest and courageous Republican Party has nothing to fear from the current situation."

Aug 26

dbreunig:

This is the chart of our artistic generation.

Content growth is skyrocketing but time spent consuming content has hit a ceiling. Whichever organization helps us find the content we’re willing to pay for, thereby supporting the valuable artists, wins all the marbles.

(Via The Economist)

dbreunig:

This is the chart of our artistic generation.

Content growth is skyrocketing but time spent consuming content has hit a ceiling. Whichever organization helps us find the content we’re willing to pay for, thereby supporting the valuable artists, wins all the marbles.

(Via The Economist)

Aug 16

parislemon:

theatlantic:

The World Cities That Tweet the Most

The study, released by Paris-based Semiocast, tracked the number of tweets with location info in the month of June, 2012. New York is the top U.S. city for tweets, outranking Los Angeles, Chicago, Miami, Atlanta, and Houston. San Francisco, the city that the social media company calls home, doesn’t make an appearance in the top 20. 

Read more. [Image: Semiocast]

There was a time, not so long ago, that people were certain Twitter was only a San Francisco tech bubble thing. Now the city isn’t even in the top 20 of cities with the most usage.

parislemon:

theatlantic:

The World Cities That Tweet the Most

The study, released by Paris-based Semiocast, tracked the number of tweets with location info in the month of June, 2012. New York is the top U.S. city for tweets, outranking Los Angeles, Chicago, Miami, Atlanta, and Houston. San Francisco, the city that the social media company calls home, doesn’t make an appearance in the top 20. 

Read more. [Image: Semiocast]

There was a time, not so long ago, that people were certain Twitter was only a San Francisco tech bubble thing. Now the city isn’t even in the top 20 of cities with the most usage.

Jul 31

Lesson for @Digg: Want your users to post content to Facebook? Let them share it elsewhere first.

The new Digg is clean and simple - it’s a great start from the new owners - but as I understand it, you can’t digg content without sharing your activity to Facebook. 

It’s ironic, but one of the best ways to spread content is to not force users to share it. Instagram offers a great example, not forcing users to share with any network outside of Instagram until they opt-in.

I think this works because when you’re new to a service, you need a safe place to experiment. You don’t want to spam your Twitter or FB friends with activity on services that are unproven to you. 

If your content is worthy, users will share it when they’re ready - on the network that makes the most sense to them. If you try to force their behavior at any step, you run the risk of alienating them for good.

“What I personally hope doesn’t get lost in all the hand waving is Jonah Lehrer’s body of work. He’s one of the most stunningly original voices I’ve ever encountered. I knew it the moment I first read Proust Was A Neuroscientist. That’s why we’ve had Jonah on the show 17 times, by my count. And that’s why we will have him on again, and again, because he explores and explains with the best of them.” —

Radiolab’s Jad Abrumad, writing about Jonah Lehrer after the recycling scandal in June.

I don’t intend to cite this quote as a bit of claim chowder, but to illustrate a point.

Lehrer fashioned himself as an ‘explainer,’ a person whom can take complex ideas and boil them down to simple, understandable stories. But not all concepts are simply explained.

Reading Michael Moynihan’s excellently researched piece (which uncovered Lehrer’s fabrications), we’re confronted with the costs of Lehrer’s simple explanations. To illustrate and support his thesis regarding Dylan and creativity he resorted to to out-of-context quote usage and outright fabrication. The facts didn’t fit the neat narrative. The tale was too complex to boil down to a simple ‘turns out.’

Let’s not understand Lehrer’s fall as arrogance, lies, or one man’s mistake. Let’s use this event to remember that some ideas are not simple, are complex, and difficult to grasp. Let’s respect them as such. Reducing them down to sound bites or accepting cheap understanding when it’s offered has a cost. Sometimes – in fact quite often – life isn’t simple and we shouldn’t try to pretend that it is. Doing so keeps us from striving to understand and appreciate complexity.

(via dbreunig)

(via dbreunig)

Jul 19

Ode to @CoffeeBarSF. The city’s best coffee shop for the upwardly mobile freelancer

Recently I had some time on my hands to “explore other opportunities” and outside of staying really up-to-date on Twitter and Quora, I took some time to check out the SF coffee shop scene. The city is loaded with options, but one stood out: @CoffeeBarSF (the one in the mission). I wanted to reflect on what made it so awesome…cause why not.

The givens:

The breakdown (in order of necessary, nice to have, and icing on the cake):

Other observations:

The data:

indoor seating:
-individual seats: 12
-tables for couples: 7 tables (seating 14)
-group seating: 4-5 (seating 16-20)

outdoor seating:
-space for 15 or so

Can’t find parking near CoffeeBar (it sucks)? Here are some other decent alternatives, all with hints of the right stuff but still missing the complete package: Ritual, Epicenter Cafe, Crossroads Cafe, Haus Coffee, Philz, Axis Cafe, Sightglass.

ps: follow me on Twitter yo: @kaz